School of Art

News & Events

A public health graduate student and a second-year medical student were honored recently by the University of Cincinnati (UC) LGBTQ Center for their efforts aimed at building community ties and improving the health of the LGBTQ community at the university and beyond. Ryan Anderson, a 2019 graduate of the master’s in public health program, and Haidn Foster, a medical student finishing his second year, received the LGBTQ Bridge Builder Award, and the LGBTQ Student Activist Award, respectively, during the Lavender Graduation Ceremony held April 25. The LGBTQ Bridge Builder Award celebrates any UC student or organization for excellence and commitment in building connections between the LGBTQ community and broader student life at UC. The LGBTQ Student Activist Award recognizes any UC student for excellence in leadership or service to the LGBTQ community at UC. Both honors reflect a commitment to diversity and inclusion and the urban impact platform of UC’s strategic direction, Next Lives Here. Anderson: Educating and social norming Anderson, a former graduate student worker in the UC Student Wellness Center, was nominated for the award by Lori Bishop-Ley, his former boss and assistant director of the Student Wellness Center. She says she was impressed by Anderson’s work implementing programs across the campus that tackle sexual health, gender-based violence and alcohol, tobacco and drug education along with mental health. Anderson, who majored in gender studies and film at Miami University, spearheaded a new social norming campaign at UC funded by the Ohio Department of Higher Education. The campaign focused on bystander intervention and ways to prevent sexual violence and was titled “Togetherto100UC.” “On social media Ryan created posts that encouraged students to be more active bystanders when they see or hear acts of gender-based violence,” says Bishop-Ley. “Ryan would highlight different situations on campus where students could interrupt problematic or violent behaviors. He then would offer different ways one could safely respond if they saw that situation.” Anderson created inclusive marketing materials such as flyers and newsletters to encourage students to understand potentially problematic situations with a new perspective, explains Bishop-Ley. Assessment tools he developed for this project also will help inform future campaigns. Bishop-Ley says Anderson helped organize monthly HIV testing services for the Student Wellness Center and worked closely with Caracole, a longtime partner of the center and Greater Cincinnati’s non-profit AIDS service organization. He educated students waiting for HIV testing about the test itself and offered information about other sexually transmitted infections and discussed safer sexual health practices, explains Bishop-Ley. Anderson was a Pride Ambassador with the UC LGBTQ Center and this role allowed him to align his values with his passion and build meaningful connections with LGBTQ students, explains Bishop-Ley. “The Wellness Center gave me so many opportunities and put a lot of trust in me,” says Anderson. “During my third week I was teaching alone for our sanction classes for alcohol and drugs. I really appreciated that they had that much trust in me.” Anderson hopes that as a recent graduate he can continue his work advancing HIV and sexually transmitted infection prevention and has his sights on a fellowship with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the National Institutes of Health. “There are so many students doing powerful work all over campus so to be selected for such a great award was really amazing,” says Anderson. Foster: Redefining patient experiences Foster, a medical student who is interested in becoming an oncologist, launched the nonprofit online publication Pride in Practice earlier this year to offer more comprehensive LGBTQ health care education for medical students, residents, physicians and other health care workers. He was nominated by Sarah Pickle, MD, an associate professor of family medicine and associate division director, medical education, for the student activism award. Foster, a 31-year-old native of Seattle, has a special interest in LGBTQ health. He graduated with undergraduate and master’s degrees in English from the University of Washington and ran a marketing company for several years before going back to Portland State University for a Bachelor of Science degree in preparation for starting medical school. An experience with a chronic medical condition that caused severe pain, but was ultimately treated successfully, left him curious about his body and how physicians managed to cure him. His publication serves a resource on LGBTQ health care and includes articles written by UC faculty, staff and students as well as community activists and physicians from across the country. Recently, Pride in Practice became a registered 501(c)(3) public charity. One of Foster’s new initiatives on Pride in Practice is a provider resource portal with guides and clinical resources that medical professionals can easily share and print for use in the clinic. Resources currently in the portal include a physician guide to gender pronouns and a list of crisis hotlines for LGBTQ patients. Pickle says she is amazed Foster has time to serve as editor-in-chief of Pride in Practice. He also advances LGBTQ health care policy through his involvement in the American Medical Association. “Medical school is an extremely challenging time for future physicians,” says Pickle, also a UC Health physician. “They spend four years learning every aspect of the human body and the human experience. They memorize millions of facts, chemical models, medications and disease pathways. For most medical students, they spend most of their time studying, having clinical experiences, and many volunteer in the community. “Haidn Foster, in the midst of the academic rigor of his first two years of medical school, decided to become a CEO and author,” says Pickle. “So in the midst of learning about how to care for patients, Haidn is redefining how the medical community should care for persons across the spectrums of gender and sexuality.” Foster says receiving the award was pretty exciting. “I didn’t know I had been nominated, and a notification just came into my inbox one day that I had been selected for this award,” says Foster, who later learned Pickle had nominated him. “Dr. Pickle has been a tremendous mentor to me. She was my preceptor, and we have worked closely together on events such as the Transgender Day of Visibility in downtown Cincinnati. I’m so grateful to her and the UC LGBTQ Center for helping to highlight the importance of LGBTQ-inclusive health care.”

Two Bearcats honored for LGBTQ activism

by System | Jun 06, 2019
Practice makes perfect so the saying goes. Maybe it is also true for the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine as it moves through the reaccreditation process with the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME). LCME is the official accrediting body for medical schools in the United States and Canada and is reviewing comprehensive data on the university’s medical school as part of an institutional self-study with plans to make an official site visit in October. In preparation of that visit, the College of Medicine will hold two ‘mock visits’—one June 3-4 and a second visit set Sept. 9-10. “It will be very good practice in terms of logistics with the official survey team,” says Pamela Baker, PhD, associate dean of medical education and faculty accreditation lead. “We have already done a dry run of a college tour for the team, provided guidance to participating faculty and students on questions they may be asked, and reviewed etiquette involved for the entire process.” The LCME survey team reviews a host of topics ranging from mission, leadership and faculty preparation to academic and learning environments, along with curricular objectives and assessment. The survey team also reviews student/patient safety, medical student selection, academic support, career advising, assignment, health and counseling services, and financial aid. You can read more about UC’s LCME reaccreditation process online. A LCME Self-Study Taskforce and six subcommittees of faculty, staff and medical students at the College of Medicine have spent the past eight months working with LCME to produce a 35-page Self-Study Summary Report, a completed Data Collection Instrument and an Independent Student Analysis. The information has been shared with a team of reviewers hired by the college to participate in the mock visit. That team includes three high-level administrators from other medical schools who have experience with LCME and expertise in the areas of medical school leadership, student affairs and admissions and curriculum oversight, says Baker. The self-study has allowed the college to address areas that need improvement and potential areas of concern by LCME. “It is important that we speak consistently about the improvements we have put in place,” says Baker. “Part of the feedback from the mock visit is not just where there are areas of concern, but follow up meetings with individuals or groups of individuals will occur to give them feedback on how the mock visit team perceived their interaction during the sessions.” Baker says mock visits are important in increasing the comfort level of all faculty and students participating in the process. “This is like a dress rehearsal so we can get used to the flow and rhythm of what is expected for the visit,” says Jessica Marks, director of strategic communications and recruitment in the College of Medicine’s Office of Admissions. “This will help us best prepare for the official visit in October.” Marks, who is providing staff support to Baker on LCME matters, says medical students have been an integral part of the reaccreditation process. “Every student is busy preparing for the end-of-block, USMLE step one exam, or with clinical rotations yet they still have found time to be part of the re-accreditation process,” says Marks. “Our students are invested in the success of the college and we couldn’t be more grateful to have their input in this important process.” The UC College of Medicine has a long track record of success. In 1819, Daniel Drake, MD, founded the Medical College of Ohio, the forerunner of the College of Medicine. The college’s birth is also the foundation of the University of Cincinnati which marks its bicentennial this year. For additional information about the reaccreditation process please contact Dr. Pamela Baker at bakerpl@ucmail.uc.edu or 513-558-1891.

Dress rehearsal underway for LCME reaccreditation

by System | May 29, 2019
KeyReia George was all smiles when she opened the brand new laptop. The fourth-grader at Douglas Elementary School mused about using the laptop to improve her math skills and become a champion on the Nitro Type Worldwide real-time typing competition. KeyReia’s mentors, Erin Glanker and Sabrina Rabin, are both first-year University of Cincinnati (UC) medical students, who have provided mentorship since October. The youngster was one of about 20 area schoolchildren to receive laptops from UC Med Mentors during an April 2, ceremony in CARE/Crawley Atrium. Med Mentors, a volunteer mentorship effort in the College of Medicine, connects 200 medical students with more than 100 school-age mentees. The organization works closely with the Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC) to train mentors and link them to Cincinnati Public School children for mentorship. The generous gift of laptops for these schoolchildren is the result of $10,000 in funding from the Clare Family Foundation and medical staff at Cincinnati Children’s, says Charles Cavallo, MD, president of the advisory board for UC Med Mentors and volunteer assistant professor in the UC Department of Pediatrics. “A lot of our medical students have an interest in family medicine and Med Mentors offers a really great opportunity to see firsthand some of the challenging realities families in some of our communities face,” says Keith Stringer, MD, faculty advisor for Med Mentors. “This volunteer program is made possible in large part by thoughtful, caring parents on the lookout for opportunities for their children. When medical students help by volunteering their time, it becomes a double win by aiding the kids and helping society by preparing and training future physicians for the communities they will serve,” says Stringer, an assistant professor in the UC Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and a Cincinnati Children’s pathologist. In order to grasp the mechanisms of disease, physicians often have to first examine the social determinants of health, which can play a role in the diverse ailments seen in patients, explains Stringer. Med Mentors has focused on preparing students for academic success, but mentors also expose students to cultural and extracurricular activities through visits to the museum, the Cincinnati Zoo, arts functions, field trips and sports functions. Sofia Chinchilla and Robert Toy, both second-year medical students, are co-presidents of Med Mentors. UC Med Mentors was founded in 2001 by Wan Lim, PhD, associate professor emeritus of medical education. Mentees come from various schools including several near the College of Medicine, such as North Avondale Montessori School, Clifton Fairview German School, South Avondale School and Rockdale Academy. The mentoring effort at UC targets students in grades three through six, though some students stay with Med Mentors for longer periods. Lim was on hand at the laptop ceremony to congratulate the mentees.

Laptops bring joy, spark learning for area schoolchildren

by System | Apr 11, 2019
Two dozen UC medical students are now part of the Rural Health Student Interest Group in the UC College of Medicine. The group started last August and meets about five times a year with activities designed to focus on health issues facing rural areas, offer health-related volunteer opportunities in rural areas and provide medical students shadowing opportunities with health professionals.

Medical Student Interest Group Focuses on Health Care in Rural Areas

by System | Nov 05, 2018
UC's Women in Medicine and Science (WIMS) organization is committed to serving all female faculty and trainees from the UC College of Medicine. Dedicated to the recruitment, advancement and retention of all women faculty and trainees in the College of Medicine, our overall goal is to advance the careers and leadership skills of our WIMS members. Please visit the UC WIMS website to find a schedule of events, resources, and learn about our leadership.

Celebrating Women in Medicine Month: Jaime Lewis, MD

by System | Sep 26, 2018
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A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles.

A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles.

A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles.

Daap Completes $2 Million Renovation One

by Jermaine Fields | Sep 02, 2018
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A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles.

A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles.

A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles.

Daap Completes $2 Million Renovation Two

by Jermaine Fields | Sep 02, 2018
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur
story3

A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles.

A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles.

A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles. A new DAAP contemporary design space bridges state-of-the-art technology with traditional principles.

Daap Completes $2 Million Renovation Three

by Jermaine Fields | Sep 02, 2018
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School of Art Scholarships

Thanks to the generosity of numerous alumni and friends of the college, scholarships are available to students in the School of Art. There is an application process which varies by scholarship. Deadline dates will vary. Please review thoroughly the information links below to learn the requirements of those scholarships which pertain to you.

The DAAP college-wide and school specific scholarship application is closed. We will begin accepting applications in the spring of 2019 for the 2019-2020 school year. More information regarding dates and deadlines will be available in the spring.

DAAP Sponsored

School of Art Scholarships

The William and Mary Bonansinga Scholarship

The William and Mary Bonansinga Scholarship supports School of Art students at the undergraduate and graduate levels who display exceptional academic excellence.

Amount
Varies

Eligibility
School of Art students with a minimum GPA of 3.5

Submit

  • CV/resume
  • Letter outlining interests and aspirations in your field of study
  • Names of 2 faculty members that would support you
  • Application
  • Online application during scholarship season

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daap-admissions@uc.edu

Bob Clark Scholarship

A scholarship has been created in honor of Bob Clark , who generously advised the donor as she established a business designed to benefit America's Wildland Firefighters. The donor wishes to acknowledge Mr. Clark's contribution by making this award available to a student in DAAP, from which his son graduated. Students in the third or pre-junior year of programs in the School of Design and School of Art are eligible for this $1,000 award. To be considered, students must be in good standing and have demonstrated financial need.

Amount
Varies
Eligibility
Students must be in good standing in the School of Design or School of Art and have demonstrated financial need.

Information
DAAP Student Affairs
Aronoff 5470
513-556-1376
daap-admissions@uc.edu

Beverly Helmbold Erschell Endowed Scholarship

The Beverly Helmbold Erschell Endowed Scholarship provides financial assistance to a School of Art graduate student who displays exceptional academic and creative excellence.

Amount
Varies

Eligibility
School of Art graduate students with a minimum GPA of 3.5

Submit

  • CV/resume
  • Ten images of your strongest work on CD/DVD/flash drive (this will not be returned)
  • Names of two faculty members that would support you
  • Application
  • Online application during scholarship season

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daap-admissions@uc.edu

Robert Fabe/Cook-Trane Fine Arts Award

The Robert Fabe/Cook-Trane Fine Arts Award assists students in the Bachelor of Fine Arts program and is given each year to the student(s) judged to have submitted the best portfolio for undergraduate review.

Amount
Varies

Eligibility
Bachelor of Fine Arts students participating in the Sophomore Review

Submit
Submission is automatic with participation in the Sophomore Review

Deadline
Sophomore Review

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daap-admissions@uc.edu

Mary Ann Meanwell Art History Research Support Scholarship

The Mary Ann Meanwell Art History Research Support Fund was established to be used to support student research in art history.

Amount
$1,000 conferred upon one student each academic year

Eligibility
Student must be an art history major or graduate student of art history in the School of Art at DAAP. The minimum GPA for undergraduate students is 3.0. The minimum GPA for graduate students is 3.5. Non-traditional students with financial need will be given preference.

Submit

  • CV/resume
  • Personal statement
  • Research topic and methodology - approximately 500 words
  • Names of two faculty members that would support you

Application
Online application during scholarship season

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daap-admissions@uc.edu

Kristi A. Nelson First Year Scholarship in Art History

The Kristi A. Nelson First Year Scholarship in Art History for incoming art history majors and graduate students of art history.

Amount
$1,000 conferred upon one student each academic year

Eligibility
Students must be a confirmed incoming undergraduate art history major or incoming graduate student of art history in the School of Art at DAAP. Students with financial need will be given preference.

Submit
Email the following as one pdf file to daapsoa@uc.edu:

  • CV/resume
  • Personal statement
  • Approximately 350 word essay describing your interests in art history, the reasons you find the discipline significant, and your possible career goals

Deadline
February 1

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daapsoa@uc.edu

Dr. Jonathan B. Riess Memorial Scholarship

This scholarship was established to honor the legacy of Dr. Jonathan Riess, a longtime professor of art history in DAAP. This fund provides scholarships to art history students who demonstrate academic excellence, commitment to the field, leadership and service.

Dr. Jonathan B. Riess (1947-2006) was a beloved teacher, colleague, and scholar of Italian Renaissance art and the Arts and Crafts movement at the University of Cincinnati for 30 years. His students and peers have established this fund to honor his legacy and provide the first-ever tuition scholarship for undergraduate art history majors at UC.

Amount
$1,000

Eligibility
Sophomores and juniors in art history who meet the following criteria:

  • Academic excellence, especially in Art History (minimum GPA of 3.0)
  • Commitment to the field of Art History
  • Leadership/extracurricular activities/professional activities related to the arts
  • Service to the program, college, university, and/or profession

Submit

  • CV/resume
  • 1-3 page essay describing your interests in art history, the reasons you find the discipline significant, and your possible career goals
  • Names of 2 faculty members who support you

Application
Online application during scholarship season

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daapsoa@uc.edu

The Jane Alden Stevens Art Materials Scholarship

The Jane Alden Stevens Art Materials Scholarship was established to help School of Art Fine Art students purchase materials and supplies to further artistic research in the College of DAAP. Materials and supplies can be defined as any resource used by an art student to create artwork. The award is based on the excellence of artwork shown at the Undergraduate Review and an essay outlining why they need financial assistance. Once a student is selected, he/she will receive the award over the course of his/her remaining terms of study in the Fine Arts program.

Amount
Varies

Eligibility
Undergraduate Review participants in the School of Art with a GPA of 3.2.

Submit

  • Your current CV/resume
  • Ten images of your strongest work on CD/DVD/flash drive (this will not be returned)
  • Names (only) of three faculty members who might serve as references
  • Statement concerning financial need

Deadline
Materials must be submitted to the SOA office by October 13

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daapsoa@uc.edu

The Jean Tatgenhorst Conrad Travel Fellowship Fund

This travel fellowship fund is available for fine arts or art history juniors who wish to visit a particular city, collection, or archaeological site. Students will submit a 3-5 page synopsis of their experiences gained through the assistance of the fellowship within 30 days of travel completion. The donor will receive a copy of this paper.

Amount
$1,000

Eligibility
Juniors in Fine Arts or Art History

Submit

  • CV/resume
  • Letter of intent - This should provide clear details about where, when, and why you want to visit a particular city, art collection, or archaeological site. It should outline the potential impact upon your art or art history research.
  • An itinerary
  • A budget including the type of expense and costs. Provide greater detail only if necessary for understanding the budget.
  • Names of 2 faculty members that would support you

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daapsoa@uc.edu

Grover C. Thomas Scholarship

Grover C. Thomas was the son of an Armco Steel Company machinist and his wife, Mr. & Mrs. A. A. Thomas, and a graduate of Middletown High School. He served in Europe during the second World War as a member of the U.S. Army's 78th (Lightning) Infantry Division and was awarded the bronze star for actions during the Battle of the Bluge. After the war, he briefly attended the University of Cincinnati studying art, before moving to New York City to live and work for a time. He returned to Middletown and went to work for Armco where he remained for over 30 years in different jobs in Middletown and Columbus, Ohio. After retiring, he traveled around the world with his wife, Martha Miltenberger Thomas; worked as a volunteer at Riverside Methodist Hospital in Columbus; and was an important member and officer of the Columbus Calligraphy Guild. Art was an important part of his life, whether doing work on company items for his offices at Armco or painting and calligraphy in retirement. He was recognized for his lifetime contributions by the Columbus Calligraphy Guild at a special ceremony in 2010. His love of art is carried on by his children and grandchildren, and his family hopes this scholarship will allow others to do the same in the future.

Amount
$1,000

Eligibility
School of Art majors and minors in DAAP, with preference to students from Middletown High School, and/or those who have demonstrated financial need.

Submit

  • CV/resume - please include where you attended high school
  • Names of 2 faculty members that would support you

Application
Online application during scholarship season

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daapsoa@uc.edu

Martin Tucker Travel Scholarship

The Martin Tucker Travel Scholarship is for fine art students in the School of Art who have participated in the annual New York Trip, and display exceptional academic excellence. More Info

Visual Art Education Student Travel Award

Narendra T. Sheth (1929-2013) was a lifelong educator who loved to travel all over the world during his lifetime. An immigrant to the United States from India he took a long bus trip from NYC to Houston to begin his Graduate education at Rice University. At 60 years old he joined the Peace Corps to teach Math Educators in Ghana. This Travel Award honors Narendra T. Sheth’s life and legacy by supporting travel connected with the pursuit of educational goals.

Amount
$500

Eligibility
The scholarship consists of four $500.00 grants for students pursuing Art Education Licensure (including Undergraduate and Non Matriculated students) and Art Education graduate students. The award supports travel and accommodation expenditures for the following purposes:

  • Presenting at a National Art Education Association (or related) Conference (first priority)
  • Attending a National Art Education Association (or related) Conference (second priority)
  • Student teaching Abroad (third priority)
  • Awards will be decided by SOA director and Art Education faculty based on the students' excellent academic performance, evidence of involvement in the Art Education and/or DAAP communities, and financial need.

Submit
Submit an application before travel and by the posted deadline. Your application must include the following components:

  • Description and Rationale for the trip:
    Compose a short essay that describes your travel plan and explains how this travel will advance your studies (400 word max).
  • Budget:
    Include an itemized outline or list of the anticipated expenses for the trip.
  • Submit your travel award application as an email attachment to Emily Paolucci in the School of Art Office (emily.paolucci@uc.edu) by 5pm on December 1. The subject heading of the E-mail should read: “Application for Visual Art Education Travel Award.”

Deadline
December 1

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daapsoa@uc.edu

Wolfstein Freshman Scholarship

This is a portfolio based scholarship available to entering freshmen in the Bachelor of Fine Arts program or the Pre-Art program.

Amount
Varies

Eligibility
Entering full-time freshmen students in the Fine Arts or Pre-Art programs.

Submit
Email the following as one pdf file to daapsoa@uc.edu:

  • Image list that includes your name, email and phone number at the top, followed by the titles of work including the size, medium, and year created.
  • Digital portfolio containing 10-15 examples of your best artwork.

Deadline
February 1

Information
School of Art
6431 Aronoff
513-556-2962
daapsoa@uc.edu

Wolfstein Travel Fellowships

Traveling fellowships of up to $2,500 are available each year, and are awarded on a competitive basis, to either juniors or first-year graduate students in fine arts, for national or international travel. The fellowships are awarded based on submission of travel itineraries and statements of relevance by qualified applicants. More Info

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External Scholarships
The following scholarships are not affiliated with DAAP, but offer scholarship opportunities for School of Art students.

School of Art External Scholarships

Magro Foundation

The John L. Magro Foundation Scholarship Program is designed to provide monetary assistance to students of exceptional merit obtaining a degree in the fields of music, art, theater, or science. More Info

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